Did you know that you can fly in Titan by flapping your (winged) arms?S

Next time you go to Titan—one of Saturn's moons—remember this cool factoid: "The atmosphere is so thick and the gravity so low that humans could fly through it by flapping 'wings' attached to their arms" as pointed out in Robert Zubrin's Entering Space: Creating a Spacefaring Civilization. How awesome would that be?

Did you know that you can fly in Titan by flapping your (winged) arms?S

It will look stupid, but it'd be so cool. Of course, you will need to have a spacesuit too, as Titan's atmosphere will not be good for your health:

The atmospheric composition in the stratosphere is 98.4% nitrogen—the only dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere in the Solar System aside from the Earth's—with the remaining 1.6% composed of mostly of methane (1.4%) and hydrogen (0.1–0.2%). Because methane condenses out of Titan's atmosphere at high altitudes, its abundance increases as one descends below the tropopause at an altitude of 32 km, leveling off at a value of 4.9% between 8 km and the surface. There are trace amounts of other hydrocarbons, such ethane, diacetylene, methylacetylene, acetylene and propane, and of other gases, such as cyanoacetylene, hydrogen cyanide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, cyanogen, argon and helium.

Did you know that you can fly in Titan by flapping your (winged) arms?

Images of Titan's atmosphere processed by Val Klavans.