The lunar eclipse viewed from the Moon reveals why it'll turn red

The Blood Moon is happening tonight. Our only natural satellite will turn red when the Earth blocks the Sun but, why doesn't it just disappear from the sky? Why does it glow red and orange instead? The reason is simple, as this simulation made by NASA Goddard Visualization Studio shows.

The Earth blocks all the sunlight and, by doing so, it allows the Moon to be illuminated by a much subtle light: "A red ring, the sum of all Earth's sunrises and sunsets, lines the Earth's limb and casts a ruddy light on the lunar landscape." Is that glow that makes the Moon turn Halloween orange and chimney red, to quote Tom Waits.

And, on top of that, the darkness of the sky also lets the the stars—which are always washed out by the Sun—come out. What a beautiful view that must be.


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