Back in 2006, Ralph Peters came up with this fascinating map of the Middle East. It reorganized countries and territories attending to "organic" criteria rather than the leftover arbitrary frontiers of 19th century imperialism. He thought that this may solve many of the conflicts that constantly torment the region. It makes sense, as Jolly Bengali's Maher Sameer Obiora Hoque points out:

Balkanization is not a clean process, nor is it likely to result in a purely organic recreation. Although I linked a certain amount of developmental stagnation to ethnic purity in my last post, I think that a more naturally constituted Middle East would result in a stabler Middle East, capable of beginning the process of cross-cultural exchange that is so needed to spur development and combat stagnation and the inward-looking viewpoints.

Read the rest of his analysis here.